Paxton/Patterson Blog

Helpful information about STEM education and CTE programs

Do Your Students Think Like Programmers?

by Peter 11. May 2018 12:58

 

Intro to Computer Science

 

Intro to Computer Science

Computer Science is not just about writing complicated algorithms, it’s learning the thought process of breaking down problems into smaller, more manageable steps. Not every student needs to be a computer scientist, but all students should be exposed to the basics of computer science and computational thinking because it is a critical aspect of their future.

“Computer Science is more than a discipline for a few, but rather it is an essential 21st century literacy for all students.” Cornelia Connolly (B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.)

In this module, students will explore the following:

What is computer science? • history of computers • how computers work • information & data • binary numbers  • logic statements & truth tables • software vs. hardware • the internet • basic programming • app design •  web development • computational thinking • cybersecurity • ethics & societal impacts • career planning

 

Learn why experts in the field believe

Computer Science should be taught at your school.

Contact your local Educational Consultant for more details.

877-243-8763

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Tags: school counselors, STEM lab, middle school, STEM Education, college and career ready, STEM Learning, Paxton Patterson STEM Education, Robot Programming, computer science, student coding, computer programming, student programming, computational thinking

ITEEA Program Excellence Award

by Peter 20. April 2018 08:39

 

ITEEA

Atlanta, GA – April 12, 2018: At the recent annual conference for the International Technology and Engineering Educator Association (ITEEA), 39 programs worldwide were recognized as winners of the prestigious Program Excellence Award for 2018.

Sponsored by ITEEA and Paxton/Patterson, the Program Excellence Award is one of the highest honors given to Technology & Engineering Education classroom teachers on the elementary, middle and high school levels. It is presented in recognition of outstanding contributions to the profession and students. Schools from all over the United States and around the world compete for this honor.

For details, visit ITEEA Program Excellence

 

Tags: school counselors, STEM lab, middle school, STEM Education, college and career ready, STEM Learning, Paxton Patterson STEM Education, iteea, Technology & Engineering Education, High School Engineering

Technology Paves the Way to Future Learners

by Peter 9. January 2018 11:01

 

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What Do I Want to Be When I Grow Up?

How does being exposed to technology pave the way to future careers?

"At Madison Park Middle School, students are learning by using and managing technology through Paxton/Patterson’s interactive multimedia program, while engaging in authentic problem-based learning. 1-to-1 technology, project-based learning, and group collaboration to build their ability to understand, apply, and analyze information.”

Click to watch video.

STEAM Program instructor, Jason Bruso, hopes his students will become highly skilled, successful and valuable members of the future workforce. “The more technology, the more skills and engineering you do, the more options you will have.”  His Paxton/Patterson lab provides just that.

Paxton/Patterson’s College & Career Ready Labs expose students to a wide range of knowledge and skills, encourage creativity and innovation, while exploring a variety of careers to help them figure out “What do I want to be when I grow up? 

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Tags: school counselors, Health Science Education, STEM lab, middle school, STEM Education, STEM robot, college and career ready, STEM Learning, Paxton Patterson STEM Education, S.T.E.A.M. academy student project, STEM and Language Arts, Robot Programming

Rose Students Explore Careers Through STEM Program

by Peter 7. April 2016 07:00

Paxton Patterson STEM Lab Showcase at
J.H. Rose High School

Student Working with Paxton Patterson Water Test   Student Working with Paxton Patterson Robotics   Paxton Patterson Fluid Power Trainer

 

 

 

 

Thursday, April 7, 2016

Three freshmen at J.H. Rose High School gathered around a glass tank filled with rocks, dirt, several tiny wells and a small septic tank to study how toxins can spread through a water system.

“We put about five different dyes through five different wells, and we can see how the contaminated one contaminates three other ones,” student Clay Stanley said.

Stanley and his module partners, David Massey and Kori Kone, were in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) class at Rose, which began at the high school in August. They were working in the environmental technology module as classmates worked on other projects.

“We stay in our module for a month,” Kone said. ”Then we switch modules with different people to test out the careers and interests.’”

Other modules include alternative energy, architectural design, biotechnology, construction technology, manufacturing technology, materials science, and robotics and automation.

The STEM class comes via a company called Paxton Patterson, which develops the software programs and supplies for the class, in which students basically teach and test themselves.

Since Rose already had computers, the software and materials for the class cost $92,000, according to Beth Ann Trueblood, director of career and technology education for Pitt County Schools. 

Paxton Patterson, a national company that develops and sells STEM Learning Systems to school systems, is project-based and helps students explore their interests while learning new skills.

About a dozen high schools in North Carolina use the Paxton Patterson curriculum. North Pitt will be starting the program in the fall.

“We try to create an environment for STEM education with our primary focus on advanced manufacturing,” said Roger Kennedy, an educational consultant for Paxton Patterson in North Carolina.

Advanced manufacturing skills such as 3-D modeling and programming, biotechnology, and robots and automation, are required for today’s job market, he said.

“It would get kids started,” he said. ”What we try to do is show students manufacturing is not what their parents did.”

The new type of manufacturing needs skilled workers who can design, program and maintain the expensive equipment used in advanced manufacturing, Kennedy said.

If students taking the first STEM class discover they have a special interest in a particular area like architecture or environmental technology, they can continue taking classes with that focus.

Some will be ready to enter the workforce after graduation; others may decide to pursue that career path in community college or at a four-year university.

Having skilled workers means better economic development for North Carolina, and a well-prepared workforce makes the country stronger, Kennedy said.

Rose was selected as the first high school in Pitt County to use the STEM curriculum, partly because two of its feeder schools — C.M. Eppes Middle School and E.B. Aycock Middle School — have STEM programs.

This year, the school opened the classes to those freshmen who already had taken STEM classes in middle school, according to Ashleigh Wagoner, career development coordinator at Rose.

Students Keagan McCauley and Patrick Vallandingham worked at the alternative energy module during a demonstration of the STEM program Monday. 

McCauley demonstrated how cold and heat could produce energy to run a small fan using a Stirling engine and described the problems associated with using either one on a larger scale.

His favorite module was architecture, where he explored his father’s dream of becoming an architect. 

“I really love it,” he said. ”Ever since I was younger, I really enjoyed architecture.”

In each module, the students follow a computer program to work through their projects, then answer questions and take tests before moving to the next module.

They learn to work in teams on authentic industry equipment to complete and test themselves and their projects.

-Beth Velliquette, Reflector.com
 Contact Beth Velliquette at bvelliquette@reflector.com or at 252-329-9566. 

Tags: Paxton Patterson STEM Education, Rose High School, STEM Learning Systems, Career Development, General, Paxton/Patterson News, STEM Education